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Teach First Impact Conference


The Fair Education Alliance is hosting two panel discussions at Teach First’s Impact Conference 2016, which is being held at the First Direct Arena Leeds and Leeds Samuel Beckett University on Monday 25 and Tuesday 26 July 2016. This two day event will welcome over 3,500 delegates, and will see the breadth of the education community attend, including: trainee teachers new to the classroom, Newly Qualified Teachers, Teach First Alumni/Ambassadors who have been teaching in schools for over 2 years or are now pursuing a leadership career, as well as a host of aligned organisations.

This year’s event will inspire and develop delegate’s knowledge, skills and mindsets in order to accelerate progress towards the Fair Education Impact Goals.

 

Session 1: What counts in closing the numeracy gap: Developing the right maths culture

Monday 25th July 2016 11.45 - 13:00

The achievement gap in maths opens in the earliest years of education. For some it never closes. It does not have to be like this. A strong maths culture across an Early Years setting or primary school raises children’s achievement and enjoyment of maths.  Attitudes matter, as reflected by leaders of maths across the setting or school. Strong maths leaders are teachers and practitioners with positive attitudes to maths, and the skills and confidence to support children’s development of maths understanding, enjoyment, motivation and independence, as well as a thought-through curriculum with good maths pedagogy. This is a reality for some Early Years settings and primary schools where raised maths standards have closed the gap for some of the most disadvantaged children in the country. The panel will explore some of the issues and challenges around maths culture in light of a new report to be published later in the year.

Chair: Eleanor Busby, Times Educational Supplement (TES)

Colin Hegarty, Hegarty Maths

-       Colin is a Global Teacher Prize 2016 finalist. He was the first person in his family to attend university, going to Oxford University and obtaining a First Class degree in Mathematics. For six years after university, he worked in finance in the City but always felt the urge to fulfil a radically different ambition so left his job in finance and began training to become a maths teacher. Colin used a flipped classroom approach to teach mathematics to London students aged 11-18. Since setting up a series of online teaching aids to help a student who was forced to move abroad to care for his father, Colin has created 1,500 online videos which have been viewed almost 5 million times. The free resources on Colin’s website have been used in at least 65 UK schools and have had a great impact on the grades of his students and the understanding of those across the world. He writes about educational issues online and was ranked among the top 50 most influential UK bloggers. Colin received the 2015 National Teacher of the Year award from the UK Prime Minister.

 

Wendy Jones, Trustee National Numeracy

-       Wendy Jones is a freelance writer, a former BBC education correspondent and Today programme reporter. She has also had roles as the BBC’s deputy secretary and as head of policy and public affairs for BBC Learning. In 2012 she helped to start a new education charity, National Numeracy, which aims to promote the importance of everyday maths skills. As a founding trustee, she ran the successful media launch and has since led communications to support the charity’s rising public profile. She writes and blogs – mainly on education – for various publications and websites.

 

 

Catherine Knowles, CEO Researcher Achievement for All

-       Catherine is a researcher at Achievement for All, a leading charity delivering the Achievement for All programme across schools in England; she is also a visiting fellow at the University of Warwick. Prior to this she worked as a researcher at the University of Greenwich and Canterbury Christ Church University and as a lecturer on the BA and PGCE primary education programmes at the latter university. Her research areas include evaluation, inclusive education, SEN, values education, teacher professional development and early years. She has published a number of articles and books, most recently publishing with Bloomsbury and Routledge.

 

 

Session 2: Why has the social mobility engine stalled and what can we do to restart it: Lessons from the FEA

Tuesday 26th July 2016 11.30-12.45

The Fair Education Alliance (FEA) recently published its second annual State of the Nation Report Card which found that educational inequality has remained deeply entrenched in the UK and outlines a number of policy recommendations for closing the gap between the poorest and more affluent students. The hard hitting recommendations include an overhaul of careers guidance, a mortgage deposit scheme for teachers and a greater effort by schools to promote the wellbeing and mental health of students. The panel will draw on the report to discuss why the social mobility engine in the UK has stalled and suggest ways in which it can be restarted. 

The FEA is a coalition for change in education comprising of over 60 of the UK’s leading organisations. Its mission is to use its collective voice and influence to create change by helping a wide range of stakeholders to close the gap between the most disadvantaged children and their wealthier peers.

Chair: Sir Richard Lambert, Fair Education Alliance Chair

-       Sir Richard Lambert is Chairman of the British Museum and Chancellor of Warwick University. He was editor of the Financial Times from 1991 to 2001; a member of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee from 2003 to 2006, and Director General of the CBI from 2006 to 2011.

 

 

Catherine Knowles, CEO Researcher Achievement for All

-       Catherine is a researcher at Achievement for All, a leading charity delivering the Achievement for All programme across schools in England; she is also a visiting fellow at the University of Warwick. Prior to this she worked as a researcher at the University of Greenwich and Canterbury Christ Church University and as a lecturer on the BA and PGCE primary education programmes at the latter university. Her research areas include evaluation, inclusive education, SEN, values education, teacher professional development and early years. She has published a number of articles and books, most recently publishing with Bloomsbury and Routledge.

 

 

Kayte Lawton, ‎Head of UK Policy Save the Children

-      Kayte is head of UK policy at Save the Children, where she focuses on early years research and policy. Before joining Save the Children in 2014, Kayte worked at the think tank IPPR on a range of social policy issues. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jennifer Shearman, Senior Lecturer Canterbury Christ Church University

-       Jennifer is a 2004 Teach First ambassador and has taught in schools in South London and Kent before working as a university tutor on the Teach First programme until 2014, first in London and then in the South East, where she was the programme lead.  Jennifer is currently the Partnership Development lead for the Medway region and co-leads the Fair Education Alliance Impact Goal 3 working group.  Jennifer is an Ed. D. student and her research interests include Lesson Study, teaching mathematics for growth mindset, and the role of the professional in ensuring children develop key strengths related to Character and Wellbeing.

 

 

Andrew Berwick (The Access Project)

- "My education took me from primary school in a deprived part of inner-city London to Cambridge University. I've felt the transformational impact of studying at a highly-selective university, and from my own experience as a teacher in a tough part of London I'm painfully aware that for young people in less affluent areas this remains only the remotest of possibilities.

I want to change this, which is why I joined The Access Project as Director of Tutoring in 2012. I became TAP's Director in September 2013: since then we've grown from a small local charity and are now working with hundreds of young people from less affluent backgrounds across schools in London and the West Midlands."